Ghostwriting tests for you

Writing tests with Hypothesis frees you from the tedium of deciding on and writing out specific inputs to test. Now, the hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter module can write your test functions for you too!

The idea is to provide an easy way to start property-based testing, and a seamless transition to more complex test code - because ghostwritten tests are source code that you could have written for yourself.

So just pick a function you’d like tested, and feed it to one of the functions below or our command-line interface hypothesis write -h! They follow imports, use but do not require type annotations, and generally do their best to write you a useful test.

Note

The ghostwriter requires black, but the generated code has no dependencies beyond Hypothesis itself.

Note

Legal questions? While the ghostwriter fragments and logic is under the MPL-2.0 license like the rest of Hypothesis, the output from the ghostwriter is made available under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) public domain dedication, so you can use it without any restrictions.

hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.magic(*modules_or_functions, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Guess which ghostwriters to use, for a module or collection of functions.

As for all ghostwriters, the except_ argument should be an Exception or tuple of exceptions, and style may be either "pytest" to write test functions or "unittest" to write test methods and TestCase.

After finding the public functions attached to any modules, the magic ghostwriter looks for pairs of functions to pass to roundtrip(), then checks for binary_operation() and ufunc() functions, and any others are passed to fuzz().

For example, try hypothesis write gzip on the command line!

hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.fuzz(func, *, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Write source code for a property-based test of func.

The resulting test checks that valid input only leads to expected exceptions. For example:

from re import compile, error
from hypothesis.extra import ghostwriter

ghostwriter.fuzz(compile, except_=error)

Gives:

# This test code was written by the `hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter` module
# and is provided under the Creative Commons Zero public domain dedication.
import re
from hypothesis import given, reject, strategies as st

# TODO: replace st.nothing() with an appropriate strategy

@given(pattern=st.nothing(), flags=st.just(0))
def test_fuzz_compile(pattern, flags):
    try:
        re.compile(pattern=pattern, flags=flags)
    except re.error:
        reject()

Note that it includes all the required imports. Because the pattern parameter doesn’t have annotations or a default argument, you’ll need to specify a strategy - for example text() or binary(). After that, you have a test!

hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.idempotent(func, *, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Write source code for a property-based test of func.

The resulting test checks that if you call func on it’s own output, the result does not change. For example:

from typing import Sequence
from hypothesis.extra import ghostwriter

def timsort(seq: Sequence[int]) -> Sequence[int]:
    return sorted(seq)

ghostwriter.idempotent(timsort)

Gives:

# This test code was written by the `hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter` module
# and is provided under the Creative Commons Zero public domain dedication.

from hypothesis import given, strategies as st

@given(seq=st.one_of(st.binary(), st.binary().map(bytearray), st.lists(st.integers())))
def test_idempotent_timsort(seq):
    result = timsort(seq=seq)
    repeat = timsort(seq=result)
    assert result == repeat, (result, repeat)
hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.roundtrip(*funcs, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Write source code for a property-based test of funcs.

The resulting test checks that if you call the first function, pass the result to the second (and so on), the final result is equal to the first input argument.

This is a very powerful property to test, especially when the config options are varied along with the object to round-trip. For example, try ghostwriting a test for json.dumps() - would you have thought of all that?

hypothesis write --roundtrip json.dumps json.loads
hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.equivalent(*funcs, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Write source code for a property-based test of funcs.

The resulting test checks that calling each of the functions gives the same result. This can be used as a classic ‘oracle’, such as testing a fast sorting algorithm against the sorted() builtin, or for differential testing where none of the compared functions are fully trusted but any difference indicates a bug (e.g. running a function on different numbers of threads, or simply multiple times).

The functions should have reasonably similar signatures, as only the common parameters will be passed the same arguments - any other parameters will be allowed to vary.

hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.binary_operation(func, *, associative=True, commutative=True, identity=infer, distributes_over=None, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Write property tests for the binary operation func.

While binary operations are not particularly common, they have such nice properties to test that it seems a shame not to demonstrate them with a ghostwriter. For an operator f, test that:

For example:

ghostwriter.binary_operation(
    operator.mul,
    identity=1,
    inverse=operator.div,
    distributes_over=operator.add,
    style="unittest",
)
hypothesis.extra.ghostwriter.ufunc(func, *, except_=(), style='pytest')[source]

Write a property-based test for the array unfunc func.

The resulting test checks that your ufunc or gufunc has the expected broadcasting and dtype casting behaviour. You will probably want to add extra assertions, but as with the other ghostwriters this gives you a great place to start.

hypothesis write numpy.matmul